Cassell Publishing

The History of Cassell Publishing.

     John Cassell (1817-1865) began working as a carpenter and then in the coffee business. He held a deep interest in the "temperance movement." He first published a weekly newspaper on July 1, 1848 called The Standard of Freedom promoting religious, political, and commercial freedom. The imprint name was "published by John Cassell." He also launched Working Man's Friend which was popular, among other publications. In 1849, he ran two business, publishing and grocery. In 1851, he rented part of Belle Sauvage and by 1852 had built it out for printing magazine and books. For three years he had the period of his greatest prosperity.
     By the end 1854, he fell on hard times and business loans needed repayment. In June of 1855, the printing firm of "Petter and Galpin" took over Cassell's business and the liability. From 1855 to 1858 the company was the printing firm of "Petter and Galpin" which was published by W. Kent & Co..
     In December, 1858, John Cassell became a full partner again and founded Cassell, Petter & Galpin. In 1878, it became Cassell, Petter, Galpin & Company, to accommodate Robert Turner. In 1883 it became Cassell and Company, LTD., as Petter retired. The company expanded well until 1888 when Petter died, Galpin retired from managing directorship, and Turner became chairman. The company struggled for the next twenty years. After management changes the firm started improving in 1908, under the management of Thomas Young. In 1923, it became a public company once more. In 1941, La Belle Sauvage was destroyed by German bombers. The company continued and in 1998 Orion Publishing bought them.

 

Thomas Dixon Galpin (1828-1910) was born in Dorchester, England. He was educated at Queenwood College in Hampshire. In 1851, he married Emma Pare and had 13 children. Emma's father introduced him to George Petter, a printer who was looking for a partner. He entered into the printing business with George William Petter.

 

George William Petter (1823-1888) was born in Barnstaple, England. His father was a postmaster and gave him an evangelical upbringing. This religious childhood affected his choice of material to print or to publish. He started a printing business, in Fleet Street, with his cousin George Edward Petter and Charles Duff, called "Petter, Duff & Company". When both his partners left, he found a new partner in Thomas Dixon Galpin. In 1852, they moved to Playhouse Yard and founded "Petter & Galpin."

 

 

Simon Nowell-Smith, The House of Cassell 1848-1958. (London: Cassell and Company Ltd., 1958). 

The Family of Galpin of Staffordshire and Dorset

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